Fear of Hypnosis

January 25, 2010 · Filed Under Hypnosis, Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

fear-of-hypnosisFear of hypnosis takes different forms, but basically it is the fear of revealing one’s true feelings. An employee, for instance, at a gathering which included the employer he dislikes, would never volunteer as a subject for hypnosis if the occasion arose. He would be afraid he would do or say something which might endanger his position. Hypnosis for him would be “dangerous” because he would be afraid to take the chance.

The truth is, however, Read more

Remove Symptoms with Hypnosis

January 18, 2010 · Filed Under Hypnosis, Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

symptom-removalOne objection to hypnosis is that the results are temporary as well as symptomatic. It is well to remember that most medical therapy is specifically directed to symptom removal.

How permanent is most medical treatment? Once you couple hetero-hypnosis with self-hypnosis, you afford the patient the opportunity of utilizing suggestions for his own benefit any time they are needed. This, of course, can make symptom relief permanent.

As an example, I would see no harm in teaching a patient self-hypnosis for symptomatic relief from a problem of insomnia. It would certainly be better than physically depressing the higher brain centers with sleeping pills to produce unconsciousness every night.

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Dangers of Hypnosis

January 11, 2010 · Filed Under Hypnosis, Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

dangers-of-hypnosisOne of the objections that you hear to hypnosis is that it can be dangerous in the hands of those not trained in the psychodynamics of human behavior. Inasmuch as psychiatrists and clinical psychologists are the only ones who are thoroughly trained in the analysis of human behavior, this objection, if valid, could limit hypnosis to a comparative handful of therapists.

Fortunately, it is not valid. This was proved several years ago when the “Bridey Murphy” craze gripped the country. Despite the fact that thousands of amateur hypnotists were practicing hypnosis, little or no harm resulted. I have personally instructed several thousand medical and non-medical individuals and have yet to hear of a single case where a crisis was precipitated or anything of a dangerous or detrimental nature occurred as a result of hypnosis. I have also taught several thousand persons self-hypnosis and can report the same findings.

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Resisting the Hypnosis Trance

January 4, 2010 · Filed Under Hypnosis, Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

resist-hypnosisA problem in hypnotizing a subject may exist even though the person consciously wishes to be hypnotized. Unconsciously, there may be a poor interrelationship with the hypnotist which can create an unfavorable climate for hypnosis. When this is the case, the subject doesn’t respond until such time that he relates well to the hypnotist. Even the most calculated procedures will fail until a positive transference relationship is established.

I am sure that you sometimes have said, “For some reason I don’t like that person.” If pressed for an answer, you’ll usually reply, “I can’t explain it, but I just have a feeling about him.” Actually, your subconscious reactions are influencing your thinking and you “feel” a certain way. The same thing takes place in business transactions. You either like or dislike the proposition presented to you. You may say, “I have a certain feeling about this deal.” You may not be conscious of the reasons, but your subconscious has reacted automatically because of previous experience along similar lines.

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Hypnosis and Mind Control

December 28, 2009 · Filed Under Hypnosis, Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

mind-controlA popular opinion about hypnosis is that the subject surrenders his will to the hypnotist in the process of being hypnotized. Furthermore, many believe that once the subject is hypnotized, the hypnotist has complete control of the subject and the subject is powerless to resist suggestion.

Both beliefs are erroneous. I believe the first misconception comes from seeing techniques where the hypnotist requests the subject to look into his eyes.
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Self Suggestion and Self Hypnosis

December 21, 2009 · Filed Under Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

self-sugggestionOne question that arises is: “If I’m under hypnosis, how can I give myself suggestions?” During the hypnotic state, it must be remembered, the subject is always aware of what is going on. He hears what is said, follows directions and terminates the state when told to do so.

In the self-hypnotic state, the subject is in full control. Therefore, he can think, reason, act, criticize, suggest or do whatever he desires. He can audibly give himself suggestions, or he can mentally give himself suggestions. In either case, he does not rouse from the hypnotic state until he gives himself specific suggestions to do so. Many feel if they audibly give themselves suggestions, they will “awaken.”

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Self-Hypnosis and Suggestion

December 14, 2009 · Filed Under Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

self-hypnosis-and-suggestionSuggestion plays a tremendously important role in our daily lives. It begins from naming the baby with an appropriate name to securing a suitable place for interment. I would like to call the reader’s attention to a fascinating book dealing with the unconscious reasons why we do many of the things that we do. You will be intrigued with every page of the book. It is called The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard.

My contention is that we are all suggestible and, therefore, being hypnotized or hypnotizing ourselves is just a matter of increasing the suggestibility that we already possess. Doesn’t the hypnotist begin by suggesting relaxation? Doesn’t he usually begin by requesting the subject to fix his attention on a particular object?

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What You Should Know About Hypnosis and Self-Hypnosis

December 7, 2009 · Filed Under Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

hypnotizeHypnosis has been defined as a state of heightened suggestibility in which the subject is able to uncritically accept ideas for self-improvement and act on them appropriately.

When a hypnotist hypnotizes his subject, it is known as hetero-hypnosis. When an individual puts himself into a state of hypnosis, it is known as self-hypnosis. In both cases, the subject has achieved a heightened state of suggestibility. Even in hetero-hypnosis, the subject really controls the response to suggestions. Actually, all hypnosis is really a matter of self-hypnosis. The subject enters into the hypnotic state when he is completely ready to do so. This may require from one to many attempts before it is achieved. Even if the subject insists that he wants to be hypnotized immediately, he may be resisting hypnosis unconsciously.
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What is Self-Hypnosis?

November 30, 2009 · Filed Under Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

self-hypnosisSelf-hypnosis is a highly suggestible state wherein the individual can direct suggestions to himself. It is a powerful tool in any therapeutic process, and highly motivated subjects can parallel the success of hetero-hypnosis through their own efforts. Self-hypnosis can be used as a palliative agent and can even afford lasting results in many areas of the organism.

Self-hypnosis can alleviate distressing symptoms, substitute strong responses for weak responses, help overcome bad habits, create good habits and help one’s power of concentration. The total personality is eventually changed to the point where it can function adequately in an increasingly difficult environment.

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Power of Suggestion

November 23, 2009 · Filed Under Learn Self-Hypnosis · Comment 

power-of-suggestionAll of us like to think that our actions and reactions are a result of logical thought processes, but the fact is that suggestion influences our thinking a great deal more than logic. Consciously or unconsciously, our feelings about almost everything are largely molded by ready-made opinions and attitudes fostered by our mass methods of communication. We cannot buy a bar of soap or a filtered cigarette without paying tribute to the impact of suggestion.

Right or wrong, most of us place more confidence in what “they” say than we do in our own powers of reason. This is the basic reason why psychiatrists are in short supply. We distrust our own mental processes and want an expert to tell us what to think and feel.

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